2010-vftgs

2011-01-17 00:59 A tentative endorsement of ClamWin

posted Jul 24, 2011, 6:14 PM by Boyce Crownover   [ updated Feb 9, 2012, 7:09 PM ]

ClamWin uses ClamAV resources but was designed to run on Windows and is somewhat mature. It can work with centralized updates, email notices upon virus detection and runs on any likely version of Windows. It has a plug-in for Outlook and is integrated into Explorer, though I'm not sure it does on-access scanning. (It didn't in the past, but it might now.) We most appreciate it on servers where we have little exposure to viruses but need something that can report if a potential virus is found.

MS Security Essentials isn't for servers, so ClamWin comes in handy where we don't want to spend the money for other AV products. The reporting feature is handy for these machines because many of them don't have someone logging into them through the GUI more than once a month. Be wary of the option to remove viruses from the system rather than just from memory though, in the past it had a pretty high false positive rate. (They seem to have fixed that now, your mileage may vary.)

2010-12-21 23:59 What if you had video evidence?

posted Jul 24, 2011, 6:08 PM by Boyce Crownover   [ updated Jul 24, 2011, 6:44 PM ]

I was looking for a place to put this, just to make sure somebody records it as "prior art". Every vehicle and potentially non-vehicle items, should be capable of transmitting fail-safe video uploads to a public server. That server should receive video which is made public at any instance where, after a pre-set time, if a password is not entered, the site will automatically make it public.

As an example, many if not most cars would have at least four cameras which constantly record audio and video which are constantly uploaded to a internet server. That video remains private so long as a password is entered at an appropriate time, but becomes public if it is not. Non-public video is available with the password for download for a specific period of time then deleted by the host. If you forget your password, or deliberately pick an invisible password, your video becomes public without any interaction on your part. Every dangerous driving episode you witness is potentially evidence against the perpetrator, but so is every interaction you have with anybody, police included.

Here's how I imagine a hypothetical routine traffic stop proceeding in one of two ways, Scenario One:
Officer: License and registration please.
Driver: Here you are officer, and though it may be legal not to, as a courtesy, I would like to draw your attention to the "Ever Vigilant" stickers on my car. These stickers indicate the cameras which record all activity in the vicinity of my car. My interactions with law enforcement have always been good, and I expect this record to show the same.
Officer: This is not a public record and I'm giving you a lawful order to desist recording now.
Driver: I do not have the ability to cease recording and the legal rights to do so are defended by the "Ever Vigilant" corporation, but I will gladly comply with any lawful requests that I can. As you can see, I'm reading from the script provided on the sticker on my dashboard.
Officer: Thank you for making the situation clear. I am now ordering you to leave your vehicle and accompany me to my patrol car.
Driver: As advised by "Ever Vigilant" I will do so but must ask, is there a reason you cannot continue providing the public service you provide within the scope of the recording devices provided by "Ever Vigilant" equipment?
Officer: Leave your vehicle now.
...(time passes)
Jury: We find the officer guilty of the following offences...
Scenario two:
Officer: License and registration please.
Driver: Here you are officer, and though it may be legal not to, as a courtesy, I would like to draw your attention to the "Ever Vigilant" stickers on my car. These stickers indicate the cameras which record all activity in the vicinity of my car. My interactions with law enforcement have always been good, and I expect this record to show the same.
Officer: Thank you for saying so, but officers of Dallas County are trained to notice such things, and of course consent even if not legally required to recordings. Thank you for your license and registration, do you know why I pulled you over today?
Driver: You're welcome, but I don't know why you pulled me over.
Officer: Our radar equipment recorded you exceeding the speed limit, is there an emergency which would require you to exceed the speed limit today?
Driver: I wasn't aware that I was breaking any laws, but I hope that the "Ever Vigilant" software will show that I was following a reasonable application of the law. (You may note that I'm reading a sticker on my dashboard as recommended by "Ever Vigilant.")
Officer: I see that, please wait in your car.
...(time passes)
(non-contest plea, video public, and don't laugh, I personally appreciate obvious courtesy and training even if guilty of an offence)
Commanding officer: ... and as shown by Ever Vigilant surveillance recordings presented by a stopped speeder, courtesy becoming an officer of the law, recommend this officer for promotion.

Every public interaction would potentially be public video record, presented without interruption by a third party. Bicycle helmets, backpacks, even strollers would present the "Ever Vigilant" sticker. In reality, the google search I did for "Ever Vigilant" came up with a website unrelated to the examples given, and I don't know of anybody offering this service, but I think someone should and I think it should be common. At the very least, it would move the conflict from an individual accused of wrongdoing vs. officer of the law, to third party vs. whomever with potential substantial legal representation.

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